Constant m Orbits

Constant m Orbits

Coming too near a dark star is like stepping in to a coal pit. Any self consistent numerical method can be used and your method looks very promising.

Constant m Orbits

I like the name "dark star". There was a Russian SciFi film in the sixties where a spaceship came near to a dark star. The star was only visible by hiding the view to other stars and nebulae behind the object. Unfortunately the star had a devastating effect on the crew…

Coming back to notes 438(1,2): I found that with the parameters of the S2 star it is quite difficult to keep closed orbits when changing the central mass. One has to search new initial conditions for each parameter set, and numerical stability limits are quickly reached when increasing the central mass. Since we are planning to study different effects as
– relativistic vs. Newtonian theory
– constant and non-constant m functions
it seems to make more sense to use a model system with unified parameters. This will also give more numerical stability.

Am 23.04.2019 um 12:35 schrieb Myron Evans:

Constant m Orbits

These are defined by Eqs. (1) and (2) and when solved give a precessing orbit. In the particular case m = 1 they give the precessing orbits of special relativity. It would be very interesting to investigate the properties of the precession as M becomes infinite and the dark star is formed. I use Michel’s appellation "dark star" (1783). For different values of constant m the orbit departs more and more from special relativity because it is an orbit of generally covariant m theory. The complete orbit equations are Eqs. (7) and (8) of Note 438(1). It would be very interesting to investigate what happens to the orbit as M approaches infinity and the dark star is formed. It is already known that the complete orbit equations spark off new physics of many different kinds. In order not to waste the astronomical data on the fictitious "black holes" they can be reinterpreted in terms of the dark star and m theory. The unhealthy obsession or fixation on black holes is due to the fact that funding depends on finding them, even though they do not exist. The same type of idee fixe is present in the obsessions about the Higgs boson and gravitational radiation. This is the age hold habit of forcing nature into anthropomorphic preconceptions – the opposite of Baconian science.

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